Medical Conditions that you Must Report to the DVLA

There’s no legal age at which you must stop driving. You can decide when to stop, but medical conditions can affect your driving and might mean you have to give up your driving licence until you can meet the medical standards of fitness to drive again.

When you decide to stop driving or are advised by your doctor to stop you’ll need to tell DVLA and send them your licence.

Do I need to tell the DVLA that I have been prescribed glasses or spectacles?

You must wear glasses or contact lenses every time you drive if you need them to meet the ‘standards of vision for driving’.

You must tell DVLA if you’ve got any problem with your eyesight that affects both of your eyes, or the remaining eye if you only have one eye.

This doesn’t include being short or long sighted or colour blind. You also don’t need to say if you’ve had surgery to correct short-sightedness and can meet the eyesight standards.

You must be able to read (with glasses or contact lenses, if necessary) a car number plate made after 1 September 2001 from 20 metres.

You must also meet the minimum eyesight standard for driving by having a visual acuity of at least decimal 0.5 (6/12) measured on the Snellen scale (with glasses or contact lenses, if necessary) using both eyes together or, if you have sight in one eye only, in that eye.

You must also have an adequate field of vision – your optician can tell you about this and do a test.

Other Medical Conditions DVLA Should Be Informed Of:

The DVLA conditions are divided into 8 categories:

  • Neurological disorders (including epilepsy, tumours, neurodegeneration, implants)
  • Cardiovascular disorders (including angina, arrhythmias, implants, hypertension)
  • Diabetes mellitus (including insulin treatment, complications and transplants)
  • Psychiatric disorders (including anxiety, dementia and learning disabilities)
  • Drug or alcohol misuse or dependence
  • Visual disorders (including cataract, colour blindness and night blindness)
  • Reneal and respiratory disorders (including renal failure, asthma, and carcinoma)
  • Miscellaneous conditions (including deafness, medication effects, driving after surgery and temporary conditions

Please ‘select’ the condition for more details

A

Absence seizures
Acoustic neuroma
Addison’s disease
Agoraphobia
AIDS
Alcohol problems
Alzheimer’s disease
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Amputations
Angina
Angioma
Angioplasty
Ankylosing spondylitis
Anorexia nervosa
Anxiety
Aortic aneurysm
Arachnoid Cyst
Arnold-Chiari malformation
Arrhythmia
Atrial defibrillator
Arteriovenous malformation
Arthritis
Asperger syndrome
Ataxia
Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
Autistic spectrum disorders (ASD)

B

Balloon angioplasty (leg)
Bipolar disorder
Blackouts
Blepharospasm
Blood clots
Blood pressure
Brachial plexus injury
Brain abscess, cyst or encephalitis
Brain aneurysm
Brain angioma
Brain haemorrhage
Brain injury (traumatic)
Brain tumours
Branch retinal vein occlusion
Broken limbs and driving
Burr hole surgery

C

Caesarean section
Cancer
Cataracts
Catheter ablation
Cardiac problems
Carotid artery stenosis
Cataplexy
Cerebral palsy
Chronic aortic dissection
Cognitive problems
Congenital heart disease
Convulsions
Coronary artery bypass or disease
Coronary angioplasty
Cystic fibrosis

D

Deafness
Defibrillator
Déjà vu
Dementia
Depression
Diabetes
Diabetic retinopathy
Dilated cardiomyopathy
Diplopia (double vision)
Dizziness
Drug misuse

E

Eating disorders
Empyema (brain)
Epilepsy
Essential tremor

F

Fainting
Fits
Fractured skull
Friedreich’s ataxia

G

Giddiness (recurring)
Glaucoma
Global amnesia
Grand mal seizures
Guillain-Barré syndrome

H

Head injury
Heart attack
Heart arrhythmia
Heart failure
Heart murmurs
Heart palpitations
Heart valve disease or replacement valve
Hemianopia
High blood pressure
HIV
Hodgkin’s lymphoma
Huntington’s disease
Hydrocephalus
Hypertension
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
Hypoglycaemia
Hypoxic brain damage
Hysterectomy

I

Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)
Intracerebral haemorrhage
Ischaemic heart disease

K

Kidney dialysis
Kidney problems
Korsakoff’s syndrome

L

Labyrinthitis
Learning difficulties
Left bundle branch block
Leukaemia
Lewy body dementia
Limb disability
Low blood sugar
Lumboperitoneal shunt
Lung cancer
Lymphoma

M

Macular degeneration
Malignant brain tumours
Malignant melanoma
Manic depressive psychosis
Marfan syndrome
Medulloblastoma
Memory problems (severe)
Meningioma
Mini-stroke
Monocular vision
Motor neurone disease
Multiple sclerosis
Myasthenia gravis
Myocardial infarction
Myoclonus

N

Narcolepsy
Night blindness
Nystagmus

O

Obsessive compulsive disorder
Obstructive sleep apnoea
Optic atrophy
Optic neuritis

P

Pacemakers
Palpitations
Paranoia
Paranoid schizophrenia
Paraplegia
Parkinson’s disease
Peripheral arterial disease
Peripheral neuropathy
Personality disorder
Petit mal seizures
Pituitary tumour
Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
Psychosis
Psychotic depression

R

Renal dialysis
Retinal treatment
Retinopathy

S

Schizo-affective disorder
Schizophrenia
Scotoma
Seizures
Sight in one eye only
Sleep apnoea
Sleepiness (excessive daytime)
Spinal problems and injuries and driving
Stroke
Subarachnoid haemorrhage
Surgery
Syncope

T

Tachycardia
Temporal lobe epilepsy
Tonic clonic fits
Tourette’s syndrome
Transient global amnesia
Transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
Tunnel vision

U

Usher syndrome

V

Valve disease or replacement valve
Ventricular defibrillator
Vertigo
Vision in one eye only
Visual acuity (reduced)
Visual field defects
VP shunts

W

Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

A

Do I need to tell DVLA about Absence seizures? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

An absence seizure, which used to be called a “petit mal”, is where you lose awareness of your surroundings for a short time. They mainly affect children but can happen at any age. The seizures usually only last up to 15 seconds and you won’t be able to remember them. They can happen several times a day.

Your licence may be taken away. When you can reapply for it depends on the type of attack you had.

You’ve had epileptic attacks while awake and lost consciousness

Your licence will be taken away. You can reapply if you haven’t had an attack for at least a year.

If you had a seizure because your doctor changed or reduced your anti-epilepsy medicine, you can reapply when:

  • the seizure was more than 6 months ago
  • you’ve been back on your previous medication for 6 months
  • you haven’t had another seizure in that time

You’ve had a one-off seizure while awake and lost consciousness

Your licence will be taken away. You can reapply when both the following are true:

  • you haven’t had an attack for 6 months
  • DVLA’s medical advisers decide there isn’t a high risk you’ll have another seizure

Medical advisers will base their decision on information you and your doctors send them. If they need to carry out an investigation they’ll let you know.

Otherwise, you can reapply after a year.

You’ve had attacks while asleep and awake

You may still qualify for a licence if the only attacks you’ve had in the past 3 years have been while you were asleep. DVLA will let you know whether or not you qualify after you’ve filled in the form. Until you hear from them you must stop driving.

You’ve only had attacks while asleep

You may still qualify for a licence if it’s been 12 months or more since your first attack. DVLA will let you know whether or not you qualify after you’ve filled in the form. Until you hear from them you must stop driving.

You’ve had attacks or seizures that don’t affect your consciousness or driving

You may still qualify for a licence if these are the only type of attack you’ve ever had and the first one was 12 months ago. DVLA will let you know whether or not you need to give up your licence after you’ve filled in the form. Until you hear from them you must stop driving.

Do I need to tell DVLA about Acoustic neuroma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

An acoustic neuroma is a type of non-cancerous (benign) brain tumour. It’s also known as a vestibular schwannoma.

A benign brain tumour is a growth in the brain that usually grows slowly over many years and doesn’t spread to other parts of the body.

Acoustic neuromas grow on the nerve used for hearing and balance, which can cause problems such as hearing loss and unsteadiness.

They can sometimes be serious if they become very large, but most are picked up and treated before they reach this stage.

Acoustic neuromas tend to affect adults aged 30 to 60

You must tell the DVLA if you suffer from sudden and disabling dizziness.

Talk to your doctor if you’re not sure if your acoustic neuroma causes other symptoms that will affect your driving, or if you must tell DVLA about them.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Addison’s disease? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

About 8,400 people in the UK have Addison’s disease. It can affect people of any age, although it’s most common between the ages of 30 and 50. It’s also more common in women than men.

Early-stage symptoms of Addison’s disease are similar to other more common health conditions, such as depression or flu.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Agoraphobia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Agoraphobia usually develops as a complication of panic disorder, an anxiety disorder involving panic attacks and moments of intense fear. It can arise by associating panic attacks with the places or situations where they occurred and then avoiding them.

You must tell DVLA if your condition will affect your driving

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about AIDS? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is the name used to describe a number of potentially life-threatening infections and illnesses that happen when your immune system has been severely damaged by the HIV virus.

You must tell DVLA if you have AIDS.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Alcohol problems? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Severely dependent drinkers are often able to tolerate very high levels of alcohol in amounts that would dangerously affect or even kill some people.

A dependent drinker usually experiences physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms if they suddenly cut down or stop drinking

You must tell DVLA if you have an alcohol problem.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Alzheimer’s disease? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive condition, which means the symptoms develop gradually and become more severe over the course of several years. It affects multiple brain functions.

The first sign of Alzheimer’s disease is usually minor memory problems. For example, this could be forgetting about recent conversations or events, and forgetting the names of places and objects.

You must tell DVLA if you have Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neurone disease (MND), and Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a specific disease which causes the death of neurons controlling voluntary muscles

You must tell DVLA if you have motor neurone disease – also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about an Amputation? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Physical rehabilitation is an important part of the recovery process. It can be a long, difficult and frustrating process, but it’s important to persevere. After rehabilitation, you should be able to return to work and other activities.

Your rehabilitation programme will be tailored to your individual needs and requirements and will aim to allow you to carry out as many of your normal activities as possible.

You must tell DVLA if you’ve had a limb amputated.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Angina? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Angina is chest pain caused by reduced blood flow to the heart muscles. It’s not usually life-threatening, but it’s a warning sign that you could be at risk of a heart attack or stroke.

With treatment and healthy lifestyle changes, it’s possible to control angina and reduce the risk of these more serious problems.

You don’t need to tell DVLA if you have angina.

You may continue to drive if you have angina (even if you need medication) unless it happens while resting, driving, or with emotion. You must stop driving until your symptoms are under control if it does.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Angioma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Angiomas usually appear at or near the surface of the skin anywhere on the body and may be considered bothersome depending on their location. However, they may be present as symptoms of another more serious disorder, such as cirrhosis. When they are removed, it is generally for cosmetic reasons.

You must tell DVLA if you have angiomas or cavernomas.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about an Angioplasty? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Coronary angioplasty is sometimes known as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). The combination of coronary angioplasty with stenting is usually referred to as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Ankylosing spondylitis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a long-term (chronic) condition in which the spine and other areas of the body become inflamed.

AS tends to first develop in teenagers and young adults. It’s also around three times more common in men than in women.

You must tell DVLA if your ankylosing spondylitis affects your ability to drive safely.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Anorexia nervosa? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterised by attempts to lose weight, to the point of starvation. A person with anorexia nervosa may exhibit a number of signs and symptoms, the type and severity of which may vary and may be present but not readily apparent.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from an eating disorder (eg anorexia nervosa) and it affects your ability to drive safely.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Anxiety? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

GAD is a long-term condition that causes you to feel anxious about a wide range of situations and issues, rather than one specific event.

People with GAD feel anxious most days and often struggle to remember the last time they felt relaxed. As soon as one anxious thought is resolved, another may appear about a different issue.

GAD can cause both psychological (mental) and physical symptoms.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from anxiety and it affects your ability to drive safely.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about an Aortic aneurysm? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

An aortic aneurysm is an enlargement (dilation) of the aorta to greater than 1.5 times normal size. They usually cause no symptoms except when ruptured. Occasionally, there may be abdominal, back, or leg pain.

You must tell DVLA if your aortic aneurysm is over 6 centimetres in diameter despite treatment.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Arachnoid Cyst? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid covered by arachnoidal cells and collagen that may develop between the surface of the brain and the cranial base or on the arachnoid membrane, one of the three meningeal layers that cover the brain and the spinal cord.

You must tell DVLA if you have an arachnoid cyst.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Arnold-Chiari malformation? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A Chiari malformation, previously called an Arnold-Chiari malformation, is where the lower part of the brain pushes down into the spinal canal.

You must tell DVLA if you have Arnold-Chiari malformation.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Arrhythmia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Arrhythmias can affect all age groups, but atrial fibrillation is more common in older people. Drinking alcohol in excess or being overweight increases your likelihood of developing atrial fibrillation.

You may also be at risk of developing an arrhythmia if your heart tissue is damaged because of an illness.

You must tell DVLA about your arrhythmia if one of the following applies:

  • you have distracting or disabling symptoms
  • your arrhythmia has caused or might cause incapacity

Talk to your doctor if you’re not sure if your arrhythmia causes other symptoms that will affect your driving, or if you must tell DVLA about them.

You must tell DVLA if your arrhythmia affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Atrial Fibrillation? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

In atrial fibrillation, the heart rate is irregular and can sometimes be very fast. In some cases, it can be considerably higher than 100 beats a minute.

This can cause problems including dizziness, shortness of breath and tiredness. You may be aware of noticeable heart palpitations, where your heart feels like it’s pounding, fluttering or beating irregularly, often for a few seconds or, in some cases, a few minutes.

You must tell DVLA if you have an atrial or ventricular defibrillator

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Arteriovenous malformation? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an abnormal connection between arteries and veins, bypassing the capillary system. This vascular anomaly is widely known because of its occurrence in the central nervous system (usually cerebral AVM) but can appear in any location. Although many AVMs are asymptomatic, they can cause intense pain or bleed or lead to other serious medical problems.

You must tell DVLA if you have an arteriovenous malformation.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Arthritis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Arthritis is a term often used to mean any disorder that affects joints. Symptoms generally include joint pain and stiffness. Other symptoms may include redness, warmth, swelling, and decreased range of motion of the affected joints. In some types, other organs are also affected. Onset can be gradual or sudden.

There are over 100 types of arthritis. The most common forms are osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease) and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis usually occurs with age and affects the fingers, knees, and hips. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder that often affects the hands and feet. Other types include gout, lupus, fibromyalgia, and septic arthritis. They are all types of rheumatic disease.

You must tell DVLA if you use special controls for driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Asperger syndrome? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Asperger syndrome (AS), also known as Asperger’s, is a developmental disorder characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction and nonverbal communication, along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behaviour and interests. As a milder autism spectrum disorder (ASD), it differs from other ASDs by relatively normal language and intelligence. Although not required for diagnosis, physical clumsiness and unusual use of language are common.

You must tell DVLA if you have Asperger syndrome and it affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Ataxia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Ataxia is a term for a group of disorders that affect coordination, balance and speech. Any part of the body can be affected.

You must tell DVLA if you have ataxia (including Friedrich’s ataxia).

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a group of behavioural symptoms that include inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

You must tell DVLA if your attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects your ability to drive safely.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about an Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Autism spectrum, also known as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), is a range of conditions classified as neurodevelopmental disorders. Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder present with two types of symptoms: problems in social communication and social interaction, and restricted, repetitive patterns of behaviour, interests or activities.

You must tell DVLA if your autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) affects your ability to drive safely.

 

B

Do I need to tell DVLA about Balloon angioplasty (leg)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Angioplasty, also known as balloon angioplasty and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), is a minimally invasive, endovascular procedure to widen narrowed or obstructed arteries or veins, typically to treat arterial atherosclerosis. A deflated balloon attached to a catheter (a balloon catheter) is passed over a guide-wire into the narrowed vessel and then inflated to a fixed size.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Bipolar disorder? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic depression, is a condition that affects your moods, which can swing from one extreme to another.

You must tell DVLA if you have bipolar disorder.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Blackouts? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Blackouts or Fainting (syncope) is a sudden temporary loss of consciousness that usually results in a fall. When you faint, you’ll feel weak and unsteady before passing out for a short period of time, usually only a few seconds.

You must tell DVLA if your condition affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Blepharospasm? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Blepharospasm is any abnormal contraction or twitch of the eyelid. In most cases, symptoms last for a few days then disappear without treatment, but in some cases, the twitching is chronic and persistent, causing lifelong challenges. In those cases, the symptoms are often severe enough to result in functional blindness. The person’s eyelids feel like they are clamping shut and will not open without great effort. People have normal eyes, but for periods of time are effectively blind due to their inability to open their eyelids. In contrast, the reflex blepharospasm is due to any pain in and around the eye.

You must tell DVLA if you have blepharospasm.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Blood clots? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A thrombus, colloquially called a blood clot, is the final product of the blood coagulation step in hemostasis. There are two components to a thrombus: aggregated platelets and red blood cells that form a plug, and a mesh of cross-linked fibrin protein. The substance making up a thrombus is sometimes called cruor. A thrombus is a healthy response to injury intended to prevent bleeding but can be harmful in thrombosis, when clots obstruct blood flow through healthy blood vessels.

You don’t have to tell DVLA if you have a blood clot in your lung.

You must tell DVLA if you have a blood clot in the brain.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Blood pressure? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

High blood pressure, or hypertension, rarely has noticeable symptoms. But if untreated, it increases your risk of serious problems such as heart attacks and strokes

There are many possible causes of low blood pressure. It may be low because you’re fit and healthy, or you may have inherited it from your parents. Some people develop low blood pressure as they get older.

Contact DVLA if you’re not sure if your blood pressure treatment will affect your driving.

You must tell DVLA about your condition if your treatment causes side effects that could affect your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Brachial plexus injury? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A brachial plexus injury (BPI), also known as brachial plexus lesion, is an injury to the brachial plexus, the network of nerves that conducts signals from the spinal cord to the shoulder, arm and hand. These nerves originate in the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth cervical (C5–C8), and first thoracic (T1) spinal nerves, and innervate the muscles and skin of the chest, shoulder, arm and hand.

You must tell DVLA if you have a brachial plexus injury.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Brain abscess, cyst or encephalitis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A brain abscess is a pus-filled swelling in the brain. It usually occurs when bacteria or fungi enter the brain tissue after an infection or severe head injury.

You must tell DVLA if you have a brain abscess, cyst or encephalitis.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Brain Aneurysm? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

An aneurysm is a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall, usually where it branches. As blood passes through the weakened blood vessel, the blood pressure causes a small area to bulge outwards like a balloon.

You must tell DVLA if you have a brain aneurysm.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Brain angioma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cavernous hemangioma, also called cavernous angioma, cavernoma, or cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) (when referring to presence in the brain) is a type of blood vessel malformation or hemangioma, where a collection of dilated blood vessels form a benign tumour. Because of this malformation, blood flow through the cavities, or caverns, is slow.

You must tell DVLA if you have angiomas or cavernomas.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Brain haemorrhage? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A subarachnoid haemorrhage is an uncommon type of stroke caused by bleeding on the surface of the brain. It’s a very serious condition and can be fatal.

You must tell DVLA if you have a brain haemorrhage.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Brain injury (traumatic)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

If you’ve had a severe head injury and there’s a chance you may have a brain injury, you’ll have a computerised tomography (CT) scan to assess the seriousness of the injury.

The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is often used to assess head injuries. This is a scale from 3 to 15 that identifies how serious your head injury is, based on your symptoms and whether the brain has been damaged (with 3 being most severe and 15 the least severe).

A GCS score of 13 or above would indicate a minor head injury. A score of 9 to 12 would be a moderate head injury. If a person has a severe head injury, they’ll have a score of 8 or less.

You must tell DVLA if you have a traumatic brain injury.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Brain tumours? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A brain tumour is a growth of cells in the brain that multiplies in an abnormal, uncontrollable way.
Grades and types of a brain tumour

Brain tumours are graded according to how fast they grow and how likely they are to grow back after treatment. Grade one and two tumours are low grades, and grade three and four tumours are high grades.

You must tell DVLA if you have a brain tumour.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Branch retinal vein occlusion? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Patients with BRVO usually complain of sudden onset of blurred vision or a central visual field defect. The eye examination findings of acute BRVO include superficial haemorrhages, retinal oedema, and often cotton-wool spots in a sector of retina drained by the affected vein.The obstructed vein is dilated and tortuous.

The quadrant most commonly affected is the superotemporal (63%).

Retinal neovascularization occurs in 20% of cases within the first 6–12 months of occlusion and depends on the area of retinal nonperfusion. Neovascularization is more likely to occur if more than five disc diameters of nonperfusion are present and vitreous haemorrhage can ensue.

You don’t need to tell DVLA if the condition affects one eye only and you’re still able to meet the standards of vision for driving.

You must tell DVLA if you can’t meet the standards of vision for driving.

You must tell DVLA if the condition affects both eyes.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Broken limbs and driving? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A broken leg (leg fracture) will be severely painful and may be swollen or bruised. You usually won’t be able to walk on it.

If it’s a severe fracture, the leg may be an odd shape and the bone may even be poking out of the skin.

There may have been a “crack” sound when the leg was broken, and the shock and pain of breaking your leg may cause you to feel faint, dizzy or sick.

Recovering from a broken arm or wrist – Your cast will need to stay on until the broken bone has healed. This usually takes a month or two but can take longer if the break was severe.

You must tell DVLA if you’ll be unable to drive for more than 3 months (12-weeks) because of a broken limb.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Burr hole surgery? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Burr hole surgery is the main treatment for subdural haematomas that develop a few days or weeks after a minor head injury (chronic subdural haematomas). During the procedure, one or more small holes are drilled in the skull and a flexible rubber tube is inserted to drain the haematoma.

You must tell DVLA if you’ve had burr hole surgery to remove a clot from around your brain.

 

C

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Caesarean section? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A caesarean section, or C-section, is an operation to deliver your baby through a cut made in your tummy and womb. The cut is usually made across your tummy, just below your bikini line. A caesarean is a major operation that carries a number of risks, so it’s usually only done if it’s the safest option for you and your baby.

You must tell DVLA if you’ve had a caesarean section and you’re still unable to drive 3 months later

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Cancer? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. These contrast with benign tumours, which do not spread to other parts of the body. Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss, and a change in bowel movements. While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they may have other causes. Over 100 types of cancers affect humans.

You don’t need to tell DVLA if you have cancer, unless:

  • you develop problems with your brain or nervous system
  • your doctor says you might not be fit to drive
  • you’re restricted to certain types of vehicles or vehicles that have been adapted for you
  • your medication causes side effects which could affect your driving

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Cataracts? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cataracts are when the lens, a small transparent disc inside your eye, develops cloudy patches.

Over time these patches usually become bigger causing blurry, misty vision and eventually blindness.

When we’re young, our lenses are usually like clear glass, allowing us to see through them. As we get older, they start to become frosted, like bathroom glass and begin to limit our vision.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Catheter ablation? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Catheter ablation is a minimally-invasive procedure used to remove or terminate a faulty electrical pathway from sections of the hearts of those who are prone to developing cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. If not controlled, arrhythmias increase the risk of ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac arrest. The procedure can be classified by energy source: radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Cardiac problems? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cardiac problems can be assigned to any number of conditions, It is always best to check with the DVLA regarding a specific cardiac issue.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Carotid artery stenosis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

The common carotid artery is the large artery whose pulse can be felt on both sides of the neck under the jaw. On the right side it starts from the brachiocephalic artery (a branch of the aorta), and on the left side, the artery comes directly off the aortic arch. At the throat, it forks into the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery. The internal carotid artery supplies the brain, and the external carotid artery supplies the face. This fork is a common site for atherosclerosis, an inflammatory build-up of atheromatous plaque inside the common carotid artery, or the internal carotid arteries that causes them to narrow.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Cataplexy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cataplexy is a sudden and transient episode of muscle weakness accompanied by full conscious awareness, typically triggered by emotions such as laughing, crying, or terror. Cataplexy affects approximately 70% of people who have narcolepsy and is caused by an autoimmune destruction of neurons that produce the neuropeptide hypocretin (also called orexin), which regulates arousal and wakefulness. Cataplexy without narcolepsy is rare and the cause is unknown.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from cataplexy.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Cerebral palsy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cerebral palsy is the name for a group of lifelong conditions that affect movement and coordination, caused by a problem with the brain that occurs before, during or soon after birth.

You must tell DVLA if you have cerebral palsy.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Chronic aortic dissection? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Aortic dissection (AD) occurs when an injury to the innermost layer of the aorta allows blood to flow between the layers of the aortic wall, forcing the layers apart. In most cases this is associated with a sudden onset of severe chest or back pain, often described as “tearing” in character. Also, vomiting, sweating, and lightheadedness may occur. Other symptoms may result from decreased blood supply to other organs such as stroke or mesenteric ischemia. Aortic dissection can quickly lead to death from not enough blood flow to the heart or rupture of the aorta.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Cognitive problems? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy that can help you manage your problems by changing the way you think and behave.

It’s most commonly used to treat anxiety and depression, but can be useful for other mental and physical health problems.

You must tell DVLA if you have cognitive problems.You must tell DVLA if you have congenital heart disease.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Congenital heart disease? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Congenital heart disease is a general term for a range of birth defects that affect the normal workings of the heart.

The term “congenital” means the condition is present at birth.

Congenital heart disease is one of the most common types of birth defect, affecting up to 9 in every 1,000 babies born in the UK.

You must tell DVLA if you have congenital heart disease.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Convulsions? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A convulsion is a medical condition where body muscles contract and relax rapidly and repeatedly, resulting in an uncontrolled shaking of the body. Because epileptic seizure is often a cause of convulsion, the term convulsion is sometimes used as a synonym for seizure. However, not all epileptic seizures lead to convulsions, and not all convulsions are caused by epileptic seizures. Convulsions are also consistent with an electric shock and improper enriched air scuba diving. For non-epileptic convulsions, see non-epileptic seizures.

The word “fit” is sometimes used to mean a convulsion or epileptic seizure.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from fits, seizures or convulsions.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Coronary artery bypass or disease? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a surgical procedure used to treat coronary heart disease.

It diverts blood around narrowed or clogged parts of the major arteries to improve blood flow and oxygen supply to the heart.

Around 20,000 coronary artery bypass grafts are carried out in England every year. Most of these are carried out in men, and around 80% are used to treat people who are at least 60 years of age.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Coronary angioplasty? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A coronary angioplasty is a procedure used to widen blocked or narrowed coronary arteries (the main blood vessels supplying the heart).

The term “angioplasty” means using a balloon to stretch open a narrowed or blocked artery. However, most modern angioplasty procedures also involve inserting a short wire-mesh tube, called a stent, into the artery during the procedure. The stent is left in place permanently to allow blood to flow more freely.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Cystic fibrosis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition that causes sticky mucus to build up in the lungs and digestive system. This causes lung infections and problems with digesting food.

In the UK, most cases of cystic fibrosis are picked up at birth using the newborn screening heel prick test.

Symptoms usually start in early childhood and vary from child to child, but the condition gets slowly worse over time, with the lungs and digestive system becoming increasingly damaged.

Treatments are available to help reduce the problems caused by the condition and make it easier to live with, but sadly life expectancy is shortened.

 

D

Do I need to tell DVLA about Deafness? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Hearing loss can be temporary or permanent. It often comes on gradually as you get older, but it can sometimes happen suddenly.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Defibrillator? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Defibrillation is a treatment for life-threatening cardiac dysrhythmias, specifically ventricular fibrillation (VF) and non-perfusing ventricular tachycardia (VT). A defibrillator delivers a dose of electric current (often called a countershock) to the heart. This depolarizes a large amount of the heart muscle, ending the dysrhythmia. Subsequently, the body’s natural pacemaker in the sinoatrial node of the heart is able to re-establish normal sinus rhythm.

You must tell DVLA if you have an atrial or ventricular defibrillator.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Déjà vu? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Surprisingly, goc.uk lists déjà vu as one of the health conditions that could affect your driving. Whilst most people will regard déjà vu as a common experience in healthy individuals, it is also associated with certain types of epilepsy – this experience of déjà vu is a neurological anomaly related to epileptic electrical discharge in the brain. It is this medically induced déjà vu you need to inform the DVLA about.

You must tell DVLA if you have seizures or epilepsy that cause déjà vu.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Dementia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Dementia is a broad category of brain diseases that cause a long-term and often gradual decrease in the ability to think and remember that is great enough to affect a person’s daily functioning. Other common symptoms include emotional problems, difficulties with language, and a decrease in motivation. A person’s consciousness is usually not affected. A dementia diagnosis requires a change from a person’s usual mental functioning and a greater decline than one would expect due to ageing.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from dementia.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Depression? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days.

Most people go through periods of feeling down, but when you’re depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days.

Some people think depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They’re wrong – it is a real illness with real symptoms. Depression isn’t a sign of weakness or something you can “snap out of” by “pulling yourself together”.

You must tell DVLA if your depression affects your ability to drive safely.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Diabetes? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

“Diabetes is actually five separate diseases,” reports BBC News on a study looking at nearly 9,000 people with diabetes in Sweden and Finland.

The researchers analysed certain characteristics – such as body weight, blood sugar control and presence of antibodies – against the likelihood of disease complications and need for insulin.

Based on their results, they came up with 5 sub-types or clusters of diabetes. Cluster 1 corresponds to what could be called classic type 1 diabetes, while clusters 4 and 5 correspond to type 2 diabetes. Clusters 2 and 3 can be thought of as falling between the two extremes.

You need to tell DVLA if:

  • your insulin treatment lasts (or will last) over 3 months
  • you had gestational diabetes (diabetes associated with pregnancy) and your insulin treatment lasts over 3 months after the birth
  • you get disabling hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) – or a medical professional has told you that you’re at risk of developing it

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Diabetic retinopathy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes, caused by high blood sugar levels damaging the back of the eye (retina). It can cause blindness if left undiagnosed and untreated.

However, it usually takes several years for diabetic retinopathy to reach a stage where it could threaten your sight.

You must tell DVLA if you have, or have had, retinopathy in:

  • both eyes
  • your functioning eye if you only have sight in one

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Dilated cardiomyopathy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cardiomyopathy is a general term for diseases of the heart muscle, where the walls of the heart chambers have become stretched, thickened or stiff. This affects the heart’s ability to pump blood around the body.

Some types of cardiomyopathy are inherited and are seen in children and younger people.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Diplopia (double vision)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Double vision (diplopia) is when you look at one object but can see two images. It may affect one eye or both eyes.

You must tell DVLA if you have diplopia (double vision)

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Dizziness? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Dizziness includes feeling: off-balance, giddy, lightheaded or faint like you’re spinning or things around you are spinning.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from dizziness that is sudden, disabling or recurrent.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Drug misuse? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Drug misuse is a term used commonly when prescription medication with sedative, anxiolytic, analgesic, or stimulant properties are used for mood alteration or intoxication ignoring the fact that overdose of such medicines can sometimes have serious adverse effects. It sometimes involves drug diversion from the individual for whom it was prescribed.

Prescription misuse has been defined differently and rather inconsistently based on the status of drug prescription, the uses without a prescription, intentional use to achieve intoxicating effects, route of administration, co-ingestion with alcohol, and the presence or absence of dependence symptoms. Chronic use of certain substances leads to a change in the central nervous system known as a ‘tolerance’ to the medicine such that more of the substance is needed in order to produce desired effects. With some substances, stopping or reducing use can cause withdrawal symptoms to occur, but this is highly dependent on the specific substance in question.

You must tell DVLA if you’ve used illegal drugs or misused prescription drugs.

 

E

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Eating disorders? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

An eating disorder is when you have an unhealthy attitude to food, which can take over your life and make you ill.

It can involve eating too much or too little or becoming obsessed with your weight and body shape.

But there are treatments that can help, and you can recover from an eating disorder.

Men and women of any age can get an eating disorder.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from an eating disorder (eg anorexia nervosa) and it affects your ability to drive safely.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Empyema (brain)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

An empyema is a collection or gathering of pus within a naturally existing anatomical cavity. For example, pleural empyema is empyema of the pleural cavity. It must be differentiated from an abscess, which is a collection of pus in a newly formed cavity.

You must tell DVLA if you have a brain empyema.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Epilepsy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Epilepsy is a common condition that affects the brain and causes frequent seizures.

Seizures are bursts of electrical activity in the brain that temporarily affect how it works. They can cause a wide range of symptoms.

Epilepsy can start at any age but usually starts either in childhood or in people over 60. It’s often lifelong but can sometimes get slowly better over time.

You must tell DVLA if you’ve had any epileptic attacks, seizures, fits or blackouts.

You must stop driving straight away.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about an Essential tremor? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Essential tremor (ET, also referred to as benign tremor, familial tremor, or idiopathic tremor) is the most common movement disorder; its cause is unknown. It typically involves a tremor of the arms, hands or fingers but sometimes involving the head, vocal cords or other body parts during voluntary movements such as eating and writing.

You must tell DVLA if your essential tremor affects your ability to drive safely.

 

F

Do I need to tell DVLA about Fainting? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Fainting (syncope) is a sudden temporary loss of consciousness that usually results in a fall.

When you faint, you’ll feel weak and unsteady before passing out for a short period of time, usually only a few seconds.

There may not be any warning symptoms, but some people experience: yawning, a sudden, clammy sweat, feeling sick (nausea), fast, deep breathing, confusion, lightheadedness blurred vision or spots in front of your eyes ringing in your ears.

You must tell DVLA if your condition affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Fits? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

The generic term “fits” can be attributed to a number of more specific conditions. To be safe, rather than sorry it is best to inform DVLA of any ‘fits’ and they will make a judgement on your behalf.

You must tell DVLA if your condition affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Fractured skull? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A skull fracture is a break in one or more of the eight bones that form the cranial portion of the skull, usually occurring as a result of blunt force trauma. If the force of the impact is excessive, the bone may fracture at or near the site of the impact and cause damage to the underlying physical structures contained within the skull such as the membranes, blood vessels, and brain.

You must tell DVLA if you have a serious head injury.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Friedreich’s ataxia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Friedreich’s ataxia is an autosomal recessive inherited disease that causes progressive damage to the nervous system. It manifests in initial symptoms of poor coordination such as gait disturbance; it can also lead to scoliosis, heart disease and diabetes, but does not affect cognitive function. The disease is progressive, and ultimately a wheelchair is required for mobility. Its incidence in the general population is roughly 1 in 50,000.

You must tell DVLA if you have ataxia (including Friedrich’s ataxia).

 

G

Do I need to tell DVLA about Giddiness (recurring)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

The generic term “Giddiness” can be attributed to a number of more specific conditions. To be safe, rather than sorry it is best to inform DVLA of any ‘Giddiness’, especially if it occurs more than once and they will make a judgement on your behalf.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from dizziness that is sudden, disabling or recurrent.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Glaucoma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Glaucoma is a common eye condition where the optic nerve, which connects the eye to the brain, becomes damaged. It’s usually caused by fluid building up in the front part of the eye, which increases the pressure inside the eye. Glaucoma can lead to loss of vision if it isn’t diagnosed and treated early. It can affect people of all ages but is most common in adults in their 70s and 80s.

If your glaucoma only affects one eye

You don’t need to tell DVLA if you’re diagnosed with glaucoma in one eye and your other eye has a normal field of vision.

You must tell DVLA if your glaucoma affects one eye and either of the following also apply:

  • you have a medical condition in your other eye
  • you can’t meet the visual standards for driving

If your glaucoma affects both eyes

You must tell DVLA if your glaucoma affects both eyes.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Global amnesia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Most people forget things from time to time but see a GP if you keep having problems with your memory. It could be caused by something that can be treated.

It’s probably nothing serious, but it’s best to get checked because any treatment you might need may work better if it’s started early.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Grand mal seizures? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A generalized tonic-clonic seizure (formerly known as a grand mal seizure is a type of generalised seizure that affects the entire brain. Tonic-clonic seizures are the seizure type most commonly associated with epilepsy and seizures in general, though it is a misconception that they are the only type.

Tonic-clonic seizures can be induced deliberately in electroconvulsive therapy.

You must tell DVLA if you’ve had any epileptic attacks, seizures, fits or blackouts.

You must stop driving straight away

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Guillain-Barré syndrome? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Guillain-Barré (pronounced ghee-yan bar-ray) syndrome is a very rare and serious condition that affects the nerves. It mainly affects the feet, hands and limbs, causing problems such as numbness, weakness and pain. It can be treated and most people will eventually make a full recovery, although it can occasionally be life-threatening and some people are left with long-term problems. Guillain-Barré syndrome affects people of all ages, but your chances of getting it increase as you get older.

You must tell DVLA if you have Guillain Barré syndrome.

 

H

A head injury is any injury that results in trauma to the skull or brain. The terms traumatic brain injury and head injury are often used interchangeably in the medical literature. This broad classification includes neuronal injuries, haemorrhages, vascular injuries, cranial nerve injuries, and subdural hygromas, among many others. These classifications can be further categorized as open (penetrating) or closed head injuries. This depends on if the skull was broken or not. Because head injuries cover such a broad scope of injuries, there are many causes—including accidents, falls, physical assault, or traffic accidents—that can cause head injuries. Many of these are minor, but some can be severe enough to require hospitalisation.

You must tell DVLA if you have a serious head injury.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Heart attack? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) is a serious medical emergency in which the supply of blood to the heart is suddenly blocked, usually by a blood clot. A heart attack is a medical emergency. Dial 999 and ask for an ambulance if you suspect a heart attack. A lack of blood to the heart may seriously damage the heart muscle and can be life-threatening.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Heart arrhythmia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Heart arrhythmia also known as arrhythmia, dysrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat, is a group of conditions in which the heartbeat is irregular, too fast, or too slow. A heart rate that is too fast – above 100 beats per minute in adults – is called tachycardia and a heart rate that is too slow – below 60 beats per minute – is called bradycardia. Many types of arrhythmia have no symptoms. When symptoms are present these may include palpitations or feeling a pause between heartbeats. More seriously there may be lightheadedness, passing out, shortness of breath, or chest pain. While most types of arrhythmia are not serious, some predispose a person to complications such as stroke or heart failure. Others may result in cardiac arrest.

You must tell DVLA about your arrhythmia if one of the following applies:

  • you have distracting or disabling symptoms
  • your arrhythmia has caused or might cause incapacity

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Heart failure? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Heart failure means that the heart is unable to pump blood around the body properly. It usually occurs because the heart has become too weak or stiff.

It’s sometimes called “congestive” heart failure, although this name isn’t widely used nowadays.

Heart failure doesn’t mean your heart has stopped working – it just needs some support to help it work better. It can occur at any age but is most common in older people.

Heart failure is a long-term condition that tends to get gradually worse over time. It can’t usually be cured, but the symptoms can often be controlled for many years.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Heart murmurs? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

 

Heart murmurs are heart sounds produced when blood flows across one of the heart valves that are loud enough to be heard with a stethoscope.

There are two types of murmurs. A functional murmur or “physiologic murmur” is a heart murmur that is primarily due to physiologic conditions outside the heart. Other types of murmurs are due to structural defects in the heart itself. Functional murmurs are benign (an “innocent murmur”).

Murmurs may also be the result of various problems, such as narrowing or leaking of valves, or the presence of abnormal passages through which blood flows in or near the heart. Such murmurs, known as pathologic murmurs, should be evaluated by an expert.

Heart murmurs are most frequently categorized by timing, into systolic heart murmurs and diastolic heart murmurs, differing in the part of the heartbeat on which they can be heard.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Heart palpitations? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Heart palpitations are heartbeats that suddenly become more noticeable.

Your heart may feel like it’s pounding, fluttering or beating irregularly, often for just a few seconds or minutes. You may also feel these sensations in your throat or neck.

Palpitations may seem alarming, but in most cases, they’re harmless and aren’t a sign of a serious problem.

Sometimes you may feel an extra or missed beat. These are known as ectopic beats and are also usually nothing to worry about.

You must tell DVLA if you have heart palpitations.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Heart valve disease or replacement valve? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Valvular heart disease is any disease process involving one or more of the four valves of the heart (the aortic and bicuspid valves on the left side of the heart and the pulmonary and tricuspid valves on the right side of the heart. These conditions occur largely as a consequence of ageing, but may also be the result of congenital (inborn) abnormalities or a specific disease or physiologic processes including rheumatic heart disease and pregnancy.

An aortic valve replacement is a type of open-heart surgery used to treat problems with the heart’s aortic valve.

The aortic valve controls the flow of blood out from the heart to the rest of the body.

An aortic valve replacement involves removing a faulty or damaged valve and replacing it with a new one made from synthetic materials or animal tissue.

It’s a major operation that isn’t suitable for everyone and can take a long time to recover from.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Hemianopia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Hemianopsia, or hemianopia, is a decreased vision or blindness (anopsia) in half the visual field, usually on one side of the vertical midline. The most common causes of this damage are a stroke, brain tumour, and trauma.  There are two identified classifications – permanent hemianopsia, transitory or temporary hemianopsia.

You must tell DVLA if you have hemianopia, which is also called hemianopsia.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about High blood pressure? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

High blood pressure, or hypertension, rarely has noticeable symptoms. But if untreated, it increases your risk of serious problems such as heart attacks and strokes. More than one in four adults in the UK have high blood pressure, although many won’t realise it.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about HIV? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that damages the cells in your immune system and weakens your ability to fight everyday infections and disease.

While AIDS can’t be transmitted from one person to another, the HIV virus can.

There’s currently no cure for HIV, but there are very effective drug treatments that enable most people with the virus to live a long and healthy life.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Hodgkin’s lymphoma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Hodgkin lymphoma is an uncommon cancer that develops in the lymphatic system, which is a network of vessels and glands spread throughout your body.

The lymphatic system is part of your immune system. A clear fluid called lymph flows through the lymphatic vessels and contains infection-fighting white blood cells, known as lymphocytes.

In Hodgkin lymphoma, B-lymphocytes (a particular type of lymphocyte) start to multiply in an abnormal way and begin to collect in certain parts of the lymphatic system, such as the lymph nodes (glands). The affected lymphocytes lose their infection-fighting properties, making you more vulnerable to infection.

The most common symptom of Hodgkin lymphoma is a painless swelling in a lymph node, usually in the neck, armpit or groin.

You must tell DVLA if you have Hodgkin’s lymphoma and any of the following also apply:

  • you develop problems with your brain or nervous system
  • your doctor says you might not be fit to drive
  • you’re restricted to certain types of vehicles or vehicles that have been adapted for you
  • your medication causes side effects which could affect your driving

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Huntington’s disease? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Huntington’s disease is a condition that stops parts of the brain working properly over time. It’s passed on (inherited) from a person’s parents.

It gets gradually worse over time and is usually fatal after a period of up to 20 years.

You must tell DVLA if you have Huntington’s disease and it causes any symptoms.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Hydrocephalus? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

There are three main types of hydrocephalus:

  • congenital hydrocephalus – hydrocephalus that’s present at birth
  • acquired hydrocephalus – hydrocephalus that develops after birth
  • normal pressure hydrocephalus – usually only develops in older people

Hydrocephalus is a build-up of fluid on the brain. The excess fluid puts pressure on the brain, which can damage it.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Hypertension? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

High blood pressure, or hypertension, rarely has noticeable symptoms. But if untreated, it increases your risk of serious problems such as heart attacks and strokes.

More than one in four adults in the UK have high blood pressure, although many won’t realise it.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a condition in which a portion of the heart becomes thickened without an obvious cause. This results in the heart being less able to pump blood effectively. Symptoms vary from none to feeling tired, leg swelling, and shortness of breath. It may also result in chest pain or fainting. Complications include heart failure, an irregular heartbeat, and sudden cardiac death. 

HCM is most commonly inherited from a person’s parents.

You must tell DVLA if you have hydrocephalus.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Hypoglycaemia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A low blood sugar also called hypoglycaemia or a “hypo”, is where the level of sugar (glucose) in your blood drops too low.

It mainly affects people with diabetes, especially if you take insulin.

A low blood sugar can be dangerous if it’s not treated promptly, but you can usually treat it easily yourself.

You must tell DVLA if you have hypoglycaemia.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Hypoxic brain damage? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cerebral hypoxia is a form of hypoxia (reduced supply of oxygen), specifically involving the brain; when the brain is completely deprived of oxygen, it is called cerebral anoxia. There are four categories of cerebral hypoxia; they are, in order of severity: diffuse cerebral hypoxia (DCH), focal cerebral ischemia, cerebral infarction, and global cerebral ischemia. Prolonged hypoxia induces neuronal cell death via apoptosis, resulting in a hypoxic brain injury.

Cases of total oxygen deprivation are termed “anoxia”, which can be hypoxic in origin (reduced oxygen availability) or ischemic in origin (oxygen deprivation due to a disruption in blood flow). Brain injury as a result of oxygen deprivation either due to hypoxic or anoxic mechanisms are generally termed hypoxic/anoxic injuries (HAI). Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a condition that occurs when the entire brain is deprived of an adequate oxygen supply, but the deprivation is not total. While HIE is associated in most cases with oxygen deprivation in the neonate due to birth asphyxia, it can occur in all age groups and is often a complication of cardiac arrest.

You must tell DVLA about your hypoxic brain damage.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Hysterectomy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the womb (uterus). You’ll no longer be able to get pregnant after the operation.

If you haven’t already gone through the menopause, you’ll no longer have periods, regardless of your age. The menopause is when a woman’s monthly periods stop, which usually occurs from the ages of to 45 to 55.

Around 30,500 hysterectomies were carried out in England in 2012 and 2013. It’s more common for women aged 40-50 to have a hysterectomy.

You must tell DVLA if you’ve had a hysterectomy and you’re still unable to drive 3 months later.

 

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Do I need to tell DVLA about Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or automated implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD) is a device implantable inside the body, able to perform cardioversion, defibrillation, and (in modern versions) pacing of the heart. The device is therefore capable of correcting most life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. The ICD is the first-line treatment and prophylactic therapy for patients at risk for sudden cardiac death due to ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. Current devices can be programmed to detect abnormal heart rhythms and deliver therapy via programmable anti-tachycardia pacing in addition to low-energy and high-energy shocks.

“AICD” was trademarked by the Boston Scientific Corporation, so the more generic “ICD” is preferred terminology.

You must tell DVLA if you have an atrial or ventricular defibrillator.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Intracerebral haemorrhage? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), also known as cerebral bleed, is a type of intracranial bleed that occurs within the brain tissue or ventricles. Symptoms can include a headache, one-sided weakness, vomiting, seizures, decreased level of consciousness, and neck stiffness. Often symptoms get worse over time. Fever is also common. In many cases bleeding is present in both the brain tissue and the ventricles.

You must tell DVLA if you’re still having problems a month after an intracerebral haemorrhage.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Ischaemic heart disease? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Coronary artery disease (CAD), also known as ischemic heart disease (IHD), refers to a group of diseases which includes stable angina, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. It is within the group of cardiovascular diseases of which it is the most common type. A common symptom is chest pain or discomfort which may travel into the shoulder, arm, back, neck, or jaw.

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Do I need to tell DVLA about Kidney dialysis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

In medicine, dialysis is the process of removing excess water, solutes and toxins from the blood in those whose native kidneys have lost the ability to perform these functions in a natural way. This is referred to as renal replacement therapy.

Dialysis may be used in those with rapidly developing loss of kidney function, called acute kidney injury (previously called acute renal failure); or slowly worsening kidney function, called Stage 5 chronic kidney disease, (previously called chronic kidney failure and end-stage renal disease and end-stage kidney disease).

Dialysis is used as a temporary measure in either acute kidney injury or in those awaiting kidney transplant and as a permanent measure in those for whom a transplant is not indicated or not possible

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Kidney problems? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

The number of people with serious kidney problems, such as kidney disease and kidney cancer, is increasing.

 Kidneys are vital organs that remove excess water and cleanse the blood of toxins. When the kidneys fail, waste products and fluid build up in the body, making you feel unwell, gain weight, become breathless, and get swollen hands and feet.

The kidneys also produce hormones that help control blood pressure, boost the production of red blood cells and keep bones healthy. This means that severe kidney damage can lead to high blood pressure, anaemia and bone disease.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Korsakoff’s syndrome? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Korsakoff’s syndrome is an amnestic disorder caused by thiamine deficiency usually associated with prolonged ingestion of alcohol. It is rare among other people but some cases have been observed after bariatric surgeries when the deficiency was not prevented by use of nutritional supplements. This neurological disorder is caused by a lack of thiamine (vitamin B1) in the brain and is also often exacerbated by the neurotoxic effects of alcohol.

You must tell DVLA if you have Korsakoff’s syndrome.

 

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Do I need to tell DVLA about Labyrinthitis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Labyrinthitis is an inner ear infection. It causes a delicate structure deep inside your ear called the labyrinth to become inflamed, which affects your hearing and balance.

You must tell DVLA if you have labyrinthitis.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Learning difficulties? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

There are a number of conditions that could be classed under “learning difficulties” – Intellectual disability (ID), also known as a general learning disability, and mental retardation (MR) or even Dyslexia is considered a common learning difficulty that can cause problems with reading, writing and spelling.

The DVLA will be able to discuss the individual circumstances and the specific ‘difficulty’ and provide guidance.

You must tell DVLA if you have learning difficulties.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Left bundle branch block? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is a cardiac conduction abnormality seen on the electrocardiogram (ECG). In this condition, activation of the left ventricle of the heart is delayed, which causes the left ventricle to contract later than the right ventricle.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Leukaemia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Leukaemia, also spelt Leukemia, is a group of cancers that usually begin in the bone marrow and result in high numbers of abnormal white blood cells. These white blood cells are not fully developed and are called blasts or leukaemia cells. Symptoms may include bleeding and bruising problems, feeling tired, fever, and an increased risk of infections. These symptoms occur due to a lack of normal blood cells. Diagnosis is typically made by blood tests or bone marrow biopsy.

The exact cause of leukaemia is unknown. A combination of genetic factors and environmental (non-inherited) factors are believed to play a role. Risk factors include smoking, ionizing radiation, some chemicals (such as benzene), prior chemotherapy, and Down syndrome. People with a family history of leukaemia are also at higher risk. There are four main types of leukaemia — acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) — as well as a number of less common types. Leukemias and lymphomas both belong to a broader group of tumours that affect the blood, bone marrow, and lymphoid system, known as tumours of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues.

Treatment may involve some combination of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, and bone marrow transplant, in addition to supportive care and palliative care as needed. Certain types of leukaemia may be managed with watchful waiting. The success of treatment depends on the type of leukaemia and the age of the person.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Lewy body dementia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), also known as Lewy body dementia, is a common type of dementia estimated to affect more than 100,000 people in the UK.

“Dementia” is the name for problems with mental abilities caused by gradual changes and damage in the brain. It’s rare in people under 65.

It tends to develop slowly and get gradually worse over several years.

You must tell DVLA if you have Lewy body dementia.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Limb disability? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Limb disability is a very generic term that could include minor inconvenient disability through to complete loss of the use of a limb. It is advised to discuss your individual circumstances with DVLA who can provide further guidance.

You must tell DVLA if you have a limb disability.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Low blood sugar? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A low blood sugar causes different symptoms for everybody.  If not treated low blood sugar can cause weakness, blurred vision, difficulty concentrating, confusion, unusual behaviour, slurred speech or clumsiness (like being drunk), feeling sleepy, seizures (fits), collapsing or passing out.

You must tell DVLA if you have Low Blood Sugars

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Lumboperitoneal shunt? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A lumbar–peritoneal shunt is a technique to channelise the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the lumbar thecal sac into the peritoneal cavity. A shunt is described as a tube, catheter or “surgically created anastomosis” and is designed to bypass or redirect bodily fluids from one point in the body to another. Lumbar–peritoneal shunts are used in neurological disorders.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Lung cancer? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Lung cancer is one of the most common and serious types of cancer. Around 44,500 people are diagnosed with the condition every year in the UK. There are usually no signs or symptoms in the early stages of lung cancer, but many people with the condition eventually develop symptoms.

You must tell DVLA if you have lung cancer and any of the following apply:

  • you develop problems with your brain or nervous system
  • your doctor says you might not be fit to drive
  • you’re restricted to certain types of vehicles or vehicles that have been adapted for you
  • your medication causes side effects which could affect your driving

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Lymphoma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A lymphoma is a group of blood cancers that develop from lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell. The name often refers to just the cancerous versions rather than all such tumours. Signs and symptoms may include enlarged lymph nodes, fever, drenching sweats, unintended weight loss, itching, and constantly feeling tired. The enlarged lymph nodes are usually painless. The sweats are most common at night.

There are dozens of subtypes of lymphomas. The two main categories of lymphomas are Hodgkin’s lymphomas (HL) and the non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). The World Health Organization (WHO) includes two other categories as types of lymphoma: multiple myeloma and immunoproliferative diseases. About 90% of lymphomas are non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Lymphomas and leukaemias are a part of the broader group of tumours of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues

You must tell DVLA about your lymphoma if:

  • you develop problems with your brain or nervous system
  • your doctor has expressed concerns about your fitness to drive
  • you can only drive a specially adapted vehicle or a certain type of vehicle
  • your medication causes side effects that might make it unsafe for you to drive

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Do I need to tell DVLA about Macular degeneration? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common condition that affects the middle part of your vision. It usually first affects people in their 50s and 60s. It doesn’t cause total blindness. But it can make everyday activities like reading and recognising faces difficult.

Without treatment, your vision may get worse. This can happen gradually over several years (“dry AMD”), or quickly over a few weeks or months (“wet AMD”).

You must tell DVLA if macular degeneration affects both your eyes.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Malignant brain tumours? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A malignant brain tumour is a cancerous growth in the brain.

It’s different from a benign brain tumour, which isn’t cancerous and tends to grow more slowly.  There are lots of types of brain tumour. They have different names depending on where they are in the brain.

They’re also given a number from 1 to 4 – known as the grade.

The higher the number, the more serious a tumour is:

  • grade 1 and 2 brain tumours are non-cancerous (benign) tumours that tend to grow quite slowly
  • grade 3 and 4 brain tumours are cancerous (malignant) tumours that grow more quickly and are more difficult to treat

Brain tumours are also called primary (which start in the brain) and secondary (which spread to the brain).

You must tell DVLA if you have a brain tumour.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Malignant melanoma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that can spread to other organs in the body. The most common sign of melanoma is the appearance of a new mole or a change in an existing mole. This can occur anywhere on the body, but the most commonly affected areas are the back in men and the legs in women. Melanomas are uncommon in areas which are protected from sun exposure, such as the buttocks and the scalp.
In most cases, melanomas have an irregular shape and are more than one colour. The mole may also be larger than normal and can sometimes be itchy or bleed. Look out for a mole which changes progressively in shape, size and/or colour.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Manic-depressive psychosis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Bipolar disorder, previously known as manic depression, is a mental disorder that causes periods of depression and periods of abnormally elevated mood.

You must tell DVLA if you have Manic-depressive psychosis.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Marfan syndrome? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Marfan syndrome is a disorder of the body’s connective tissues – a group of tissues that maintain the structure of the body and support internal organs and other tissues.

Children usually inherit the disorder from one of their parents.

Some people are only mildly affected by the Marfan syndrome, while others develop more serious symptoms.

You must tell DVLA if you have Marfan’s syndrome.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Medulloblastoma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Medulloblastoma is the most common type of pediatric malignant primary brain tumour (cancer), originating in the part of the brain that is towards the back and the bottom, on the floor of the skull, in the cerebellum, or posterior fossa.

The brain is divided into two main parts, the larger cerebrum on top and the smaller cerebellum below towards the back. They are separated by a membrane called the tentorium. Tumours that originate in the cerebellum or the surrounding region below the tentorium are, therefore, called infratentorial.

Historically medulloblastomas have been classified as a primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET), but it is now known that medulloblastoma is distinct from supratentorial PNETs and are no longer considered similar entities.

You must tell DVLA if you have a medulloblastoma.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Memory problems (severe)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Causes of memory loss- Memory loss can just be a natural part of getting older. Sometimes it may be caused by something common and treatable, like stress,  anxiety or depression and sleeping problems

Occasionally, memory loss can be a sign of something more serious, such as dementia.

Don’t try to self-diagnose the cause of your memory loss.

You must tell DVLA if you have severe memory problems.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Meningioma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Meningioma, also known as a meningeal tumour, is typically a slow-growing tumour that forms from the meninges, the membranous layers surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Symptoms depend on the location and occur as a result of a tumour pressing on nearby tissue. Many cases never produce symptoms. Occasionally seizures, dementia, trouble talking, vision problems, one-sided weakness, or loss of bladder control may occur.

You must tell DVLA you have meningioma if it affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Mini-stroke? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or “mini-stroke” is caused by a temporary disruption in the blood supply to part of the brain.

The disruption in blood supply results in a lack of oxygen to the brain. This can cause sudden symptoms similar to a stroke, such as speech and visual disturbance, and numbness or weakness in the face, arms and legs.

However, a TIA doesn’t last as long as a stroke. The effects often only last for a few minutes or hours and fully resolve within 24 hours.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Monocular vision? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Monocular vision is vision in which both eyes are used separately. By using the eyes in this way, as opposed by binocular vision, the field of view is increased, while depth perception is limited. The eyes of an animal with monocular vision are usually positioned on opposite sides of the animal’s head, giving it the ability to see two objects at once. The word monocular comes from the Greek root, mono for one, and the Latin root, oculus for eye.

Monocular vision impairment refers to having no vision in one eye with adequate vision in the other.

Monopsia is a medical condition in humans who cannot perceive three-dimensionally even though their two eyes are medically normal, healthy, and spaced apart in a normal way. A vision that perceives three-dimensional depth requires more than parallax. In addition, the resolution of the two disparate images, though highly similar, must be simultaneous, subconscious, and complete. (After-images and “phantom” images are symptoms of incomplete visual resolution, even though the eyes themselves exhibit remarkable acuity.) A feature article in The New Yorker magazine published in early 2006 dealt with one individual in particular, who, learning to cope with her disability, eventually learned how to see three-dimensional depth in her daily life. Medical tests are available for determining monoptic conditions in humans.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Motor neurone disease? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Motor neurone disease (MND) is an uncommon condition that affects the brain and nerves. It causes weakness that gets worse over time.

It’s always fatal and can significantly shorten life expectancy, but some people live with it for many years. There’s no cure, but there are treatments to help reduce the impact it has on your daily life.

You must tell DVLA if you have motor neurone disease – also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Multiple sclerosis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a condition which can affect the brain and/or spinal cord, causing a wide range of potential symptoms, including problems with vision, arm or leg movement, sensation or balance.

It’s a lifelong condition that can sometimes cause serious disability, although it can occasionally be mild. In many cases, it’s possible to treat symptoms. Average life expectancy is slightly reduced for people with MS.

It’s estimated that there are more than 100,000 people diagnosed with MS in the UK.

It’s most commonly diagnosed in people in their 20s and 30s, although it can develop at any age. It’s about two to three times more common in women than men.

You must tell DVLA if you have multiple sclerosis.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Myasthenia gravis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Myasthenia gravis is a rare long-term condition that causes muscle weakness that comes and goes.

It most commonly affects the muscles that control the eyes and eyelids, facial expressions, chewing, swallowing and speaking. But it can affect most parts of the body.

It can affect people of any age, typically starting in women under 40 and men over 60.

You must tell DVLA if you have myasthenia gravis.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Myocardial infarction? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Myocardial infarction (MI), commonly known as a heart attack, occurs when blood flow decreases or stops to a part of the heart, causing damage to the heart muscle. The most common symptom is chest pain or discomfort which may travel into the shoulder, arm, back, neck, or jaw. Often it occurs in the centre or left side of the chest and lasts for more than a few minutes. The discomfort may occasionally feel like heartburn. Other symptoms may include shortness of breath, nausea, feeling faint, a cold sweat, or feeling tired. About 30% of people have atypical symptoms

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Myoclonus? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Myoclonus is a brief, involuntary twitching of a muscle or a group of muscles. It describes a medical sign and, generally, is not a diagnosis of a disease. These myoclonic twitches, jerks, or seizures are usually caused by sudden muscle contractions (positive myoclonus) or brief lapses of contraction (negative myoclonus). The most common circumstance under which they occur is while falling asleep (hypnic jerk). Myoclonic jerks occur in healthy persons and are experienced occasionally by everyone.

You must tell DVLA if you have myoclonus.

 

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Do I need to tell DVLA about Narcolepsy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Narcolepsy is a rare long-term brain disorder that causes a person to suddenly fall asleep at inappropriate times.

The brain is unable to regulate sleeping and waking patterns normally, which can result in:

  • excessive daytime sleepiness – feeling very drowsy throughout the day, and having difficulty concentrating and staying awake
  • sleep attacks – falling asleep suddenly and without warning
  • cataplexy – temporary loss of muscle control resulting in weakness and possible collapse, often in response to emotions such as laughter and anger
  • sleep paralysis – a temporary inability to move or speak when waking up or falling asleep
  • excessive dreaming and waking in the night – dreams often come as you fall asleep (hypnogogic hallucinations) or just before or during waking (hypnopompic hallucinations)

Narcolepsy doesn’t cause serious or long-term physical health problems, but it can have a significant impact on daily life and be difficult to cope with emotionally.

You must tell DVLA if you have narcolepsy.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Night blindness? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Nyctalopia also called night-blindness, is a condition making it difficult or impossible to see in relatively low light. It is a symptom of several eye diseases. Night blindness may exist from birth, or be caused by injury or malnutrition (for example, vitamin A deficiency). It can be described as insufficient adaptation to darkness.

The most common cause of nyctalopia is retinitis pigmentosa, a disorder in which the rod cells in the retina gradually lose their ability to respond to the light. Patients suffering from this genetic condition have progressive nyctalopia and eventually, their daytime vision may also be affected. In X-linked congenital stationary night blindness, from birth the rods either do not work at all, or work very little, but the condition doesn’t get worse. Another cause of night blindness is a deficiency of retinol, or vitamin A, found in fish oils, liver and dairy products.

The opposite problem, the inability to see in bright light, is known as hemeralopia and is much rarer.

You must tell DVLA if you have night blindness.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Nystagmus? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Nystagmus is a condition of involuntary (or voluntary, in rare cases) eye movement, acquired in infancy or later in life, that may result in reduced or limited vision. Due to the involuntary movement of the eye, it has been called “dancing eyes”.

In a normal condition, while the head rotates about an axis, distant visual images are sustained by rotating eyes in the opposite direction on the respective axis. The semicircular canals in the vestibule sense angular acceleration. These send signals to the nuclei for eye movement in the brain. From here, a signal is relayed to the extraocular muscles to allow one’s gaze to fixate on one object as the head moves. Nystagmus also occurs when the semicircular canals are being stimulated (e.g. by means of the caloric test, or by disease) while the head is not in motion. The direction of ocular movement is related to the semicircular canal that is being stimulated.

There are two key forms of nystagmus: pathological and physiological, with variations within each type.

You must tell DVLA if you have nystagmus.

 

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Do I need to tell DVLA about an Obsessive-compulsive disorder? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common mental health condition in which a person has obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours.

It affects men, women and children and can develop at any age. Some people develop the condition early, often around puberty, but it typically develops during early adulthood.

OCD can be distressing and significantly interfere with your life, but treatment can help you keep it under control.

You must tell DVLA if your obsessive compulsive disorder affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Obstructive sleep apnoea? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a relatively common condition where the walls of the throat relax and narrow during sleep, interrupting normal breathing.This may lead to regularly interrupted sleep, which can have a big impact on quality of life and increases the risk of developing certain conditions.
Apnoea and hypopnoeaThere are two types of breathing interruption characteristic of OSA:

  • apnoea– where the muscles and soft tissues in the throat relax and collapse sufficiently to cause a total blockage of the airway; it’s called an apnoea when the airflow is blocked for 10 seconds or more
  • hypopnoea– a partial blockage of the airway that results in an airflow reduction of greater than 50% for 10 seconds or more

People with OSA may experience repeated episodes of apnoea and hypopnoea throughout the night. These events may occur around once every one or two minutes in severe cases.

You must tell DVLA if you have:

  • obstructive sleep apnoea which affects your ability to drive safely
  • obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

Do I need to tell DVLA about Optic atrophy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Optic atrophy is an end-stage that arises from myriad causes of optic nerve damage anywhere along the path from the retina to the lateral geniculate. Since the optic nerve transmits retinal information to the brain, optic atrophy is associated with vision loss. Optic atrophy is a condition that affects the optic nerve, which carries impulses from the eye to the brain. (Atrophy means to waste away or deteriorate.) Optic atrophy is not a disease, but rather a sign of a potentially more serious condition.

You must tell DVLA if you have optic atrophy.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Optic neuritis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Optic neuritis is a demyelinating inflammation of the optic nerve. It is also known as optic papillitis (when the head of the optic nerve is involved) and retrobulbar neuritis (when the posterior part of the nerve is involved). It is most often associated with multiple sclerosis, and it may lead to complete or partial loss of vision in one or both eyes.

Partial, transient vision loss (lasting less than one hour) can be an indication of early onset multiple sclerosis.

You must tell DVLA if you have optic neuritis.

 

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Do I need to tell DVLA about Pacemakers? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A pacemaker (or artificial pacemaker, so as not to be confused with the heart’s natural pacemaker) is a medical device that generates electrical impulses delivered by electrodes to contract the heart muscles and regulate the electrical conduction system of the heart.

The primary purpose of a pacemaker is to maintain an adequate heart rate, either because the heart’s natural pacemaker is not fast enough, or because there is a block in the heart’s electrical conductive system. Modern pacemakers are externally programmable and allow a cardiologist to select the optimum pacing modes for individual patients. Some combine a pacemaker and defibrillator in a single implantable device. Others have multiple electrodes stimulating differing positions within the heart to improve synchronization of the lower chambers, or ventricles, of the heart.

You must tell DVLA if you have been fitted with a pacemaker.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Palpitations? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Heart palpitations are heartbeats that suddenly become more noticeable.

Your heart may feel like it’s pounding, fluttering or beating irregularly, often for just a few seconds or minutes. You may also feel these sensations in your throat or neck.

Palpitations may seem alarming, but in most cases, they’re harmless and aren’t a sign of a serious problem.

Sometimes you may feel an extra or missed beat. These are known as ectopic beats and are also usually nothing to worry about.

You must tell DVLA if you have heart palpitations.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Paranoia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Paranoia is an instinct or thought process believed to be heavily influenced by anxiety or fear, often to the point of delusion and irrationality. Paranoid thinking typically includes persecutory, or beliefs of conspiracy concerning a perceived threat towards oneself. Paranoia is distinct from phobias, which also involve irrational fear, but usually no blame. Making false accusations and the general distrust of others also frequently accompany paranoia. For example, an incident most people would view as an accident or coincidence, a paranoid person might believe was intentional. Paranoia is a central symptom of psychosis.

You must tell DVLA if you have paranoia.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Paranoid schizophrenia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Schizophrenia changes how a person thinks and behaves.

The condition may develop slowly. The first signs can be hard to identify as they often develop during the teenage years.

Symptoms such as becoming socially withdrawn and unresponsive or changes in sleeping patterns can be mistaken for an adolescent “phase”.

People often have episodes of schizophrenia, during which their symptoms are particularly severe, followed by periods where they experience few or no symptoms. This is known as acute schizophrenia.

You must tell DVLA if you have paranoid schizophrenia.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Paraplegia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Paraplegia is an impairment in motor or sensory function of the lower extremities. It is usually caused by spinal cord injury or a congenital condition that affects the neural (brain) elements of the spinal canal. The area of the spinal canal that is affected in paraplegia is either the thoracic, lumbar, or sacral regions. Common victims of this impairment are veterans or members of the armed forces. If four limbs are affected by paralysis, tetraplegia or quadriplegia is the correct term. If only one limb is affected, the correct term is monoplegia.

Spastic paraplegia is a form of paraplegia defined by spasticity of the affected muscles, rather than flaccid paralysis.

You must tell DVLA if you are paraplegic.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Parkinson’s disease? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Parkinson’s disease is a condition in which parts of the brain become progressively damaged over many years.

The three main symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are: involuntary shaking of particular parts of the body (tremor), slow movement and stiff and inflexible muscles

A person with Parkinson’s disease can also experience a wide range of other physical and psychological symptoms

You must tell DVLA if you have Parkinson’s disease.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Peripheral arterial disease? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common condition, in which a build-up of fatty deposits in the arteries restricts blood supply to leg muscles. It’s also known as the peripheral vascular disease (PVD).

Symptoms of peripheral arterial disease:

Many people with PAD have no symptoms. However, some develop a painful ache in their legs when they walk, which usually disappears after a few minutes’ rest. The medical term for this is “intermittent claudication”.The pain can range from mild to severe, and usually goes away after a few minutes when you rest your legs.Both legs are often affected at the same time, although the pain may be worse in one leg.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Peripheral neuropathy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Peripheral neuropathy, a result of damage to your peripheral nerves, often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. It can also affect other areas of your body. Your peripheral nervous system sends information from your brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to the rest of your body.

Peripheral neuropathy develops when nerves in the body’s extremities – such as the hands, feet and arms – are damaged. The symptoms depend on which nerves are affected.

In the UK, it’s estimated that almost 1 in 10 people aged 55 or over are affected by some degree of peripheral neuropathy.

You must tell DVLA if you have peripheral neuropathy.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Personality disorder? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A person with a personality disorder thinks, feels, behaves or relates to others very differently from the average person.There are several different types of personality disorder.
Symptoms of a personality disorder symptoms vary depending on the type of personality disorder. A person with a borderline personality disorder (one of the most common types) tends to have disturbed ways of thinking, impulsive behaviour and problems controlling their emotions.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from a personality disorder and it affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Petit mal seizures? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Absence seizures are one of several kinds of seizures. These seizures are sometimes referred to as petit mal seizures (from the French for “little illness”). Absence seizures are characterized by a brief loss and return of consciousness, generally not followed by a period of lethargy (i.e. without a notable postictal state).

You must tell DVLA if you’ve had any epileptic attacks, seizures, fits or blackouts.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Pituitary tumour? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Pituitary adenomas are tumours that occur in the pituitary gland. Pituitary adenomas are generally divided into three categories depending upon their biological functioning: benign adenoma, invasive adenoma, and carcinomas. Most adenomas are benign, approximately 35% are invasive and just 0.1% to 0.2 are carcinomas. Pituitary adenomas represent from 10% to 25% of all intracranial neoplasms and the estimated prevalence rate in the general population is approximately 17%.

You must tell DVLA if you have a pituitary tumour.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder caused by very stressful, frightening or distressing events.

Someone with PTSD often relives the traumatic event through nightmares and flashbacks, and may experience feelings of isolation, irritability and guilt.

They may also have problems sleeping, such as insomnia, and find concentrating difficult.

These symptoms are often severe and persistent enough to have a significant impact on the person’s day-to-day life.

You must tell DVLA if your post-traumatic stress disorder affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Psychosis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Psychosis is a mental health problem that causes people to perceive or interpret things differently from those around them. This might involve hallucinations or delusions.
The two main symptoms of psychosis are:

  • hallucinations – where a person hears, sees and, in some cases, feels, smells or tastes things that aren’t there; a common hallucination is hearing voices
  • delusions – where a person has strong beliefs that aren’t shared by others; a common delusion is someone believing there is a conspiracy to harm them

The combination of hallucinations and delusional thinking can cause severe distress and a change in behaviour.

Experiencing the symptoms of psychosis is often referred to as having a psychotic episode.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from psychosis

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Psychotic depression? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Some people who have severe clinical depression will also experience hallucinations and delusional thinking, the symptoms of psychosis.Depression with psychosis is known as psychotic depression.
Someone with severe clinical depression feels sad and hopeless for most of the day, practically every day, and has no interest in anything. Getting through the day feels almost impossible.Other typical symptoms of severe depression are:

  • fatigue (exhaustion)
  • loss of pleasure in things
  • disturbed sleep
  • changes in appetite
  • feeling worthless and guilty
  • being unable to concentrate or being indecisive

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from psychotic depression.

 

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Do I need to tell DVLA about Renal dialysis? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

In medicine, dialysis is the process of removing excess water, solutes and toxins from the blood in those whose native kidneys have lost the ability to perform these functions in a natural way. This is referred to as renal replacement therapy.

Dialysis works on the principles of the diffusion of solutes and ultrafiltration of fluid across a semi-permeable membrane. Diffusion is a property of substances in water; substances in water tend to move from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration. Blood flows by one side of a semi-permeable membrane, and a dialysate, or special dialysis fluid, flows by the opposite side. A semipermeable membrane is a thin layer of material that contains holes of various sizes, or pores. Smaller solutes and fluid pass through the membrane, but the membrane blocks the passage of larger substances (for example, red blood cells, large proteins). This replicates the filtering process that takes place in the kidneys when the blood enters the kidneys and the larger substances are separated from the smaller ones in the glomerulus.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Retinal treatment? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A retinal tear or a detached retina is repaired with a surgical procedure. Based on your specific condition, your ophthalmologist will discuss the type of procedure recommended and will tell you about the various risks and benefits of your treatment options.

Torn retina surgery

Most retinal tears need to be treated by sealing the retina to the back wall of the eye with laser surgery or cryotherapy (a freezing treatment). Both of these procedures create a scar that helps seal the retina to the back of the eye. This prevents fluid from travelling through the tear and under the retina, which usually prevents the retina from detaching. These treatments cause little or no discomfort and may be performed in your ophthalmologist’s office.

Laser surgery (photocoagulation)
With laser surgery, your ophthalmologist uses a laser to make small burns around the retinal tear. The scarring that results seals the retina to the underlying tissue, helping to prevent a retinal detachment.

Freezing treatment (cryopexy)
Your eye surgeon uses a special freezing probe to apply intense cold and freeze the retina around the retinal tear. The result is a scar that helps secure the retina to the eye wall.

If you’ve had retinal treatment in both eyes, you must tell DVLA.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Retinopathy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Retinopathy, or retinal vascular disease, can be broadly categorized into proliferative and non-proliferative types. Frequently, retinopathy is an ocular manifestation of systemic disease as seen in diabetes or hypertension.

Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes, caused by high blood sugar levels damaging the back of the eye (retina). It can cause blindness if left undiagnosed and untreated.

However, it usually takes several years for diabetic retinopathy to reach a stage where it could threaten your sight.

You must tell DVLA if you have, or have had, retinopathy in:

  • both eyes
  • your functioning eye if you only have sight in one

S

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Schizo-affective disorder? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Schizoaffective disorder (SZASZD or SAD) is a mental disorder characterized by abnormal thought processes and deregulated emotions. The diagnosis is made when the person has features of both schizophrenia and a mood disorder—either bipolar disorder or depression—but does not strictly meet diagnostic criteria for either alone. The bipolar type is distinguished by symptoms of mania, hypomania, or mixed episode; the depressive type by symptoms of depression only. Common symptoms of the disorder include hallucinations, paranoid delusions, and disorganized speech and thinking. The onset of symptoms usually begins in young adulthood, currently with an uncertain lifetime prevalence because the disorder was redefined, but DSM-IV prevalence estimates have been less than one percent of the population, in the range of 0.5 to 0.8 percent.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Schizophrenia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Schizophrenia is a severe long-term mental health condition. It causes a range of different psychological symptoms.Doctors often describe schizophrenia as a type of psychosis. This means the person may not always be able to distinguish their own thoughts and ideas from reality.

Symptoms of schizophrenia include:

  • hallucinations – hearing or seeing things that don’t exist
  • delusions – unusual beliefs not based on reality
  • muddled thoughts based on hallucinations or delusions
  • changes in behaviour

Some people think schizophrenia causes a “split personality” or violent behaviour. This is not true.

You must tell DVLA if you have a schizo-affective disorder.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Scotoma? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A scotoma is an area of partial alteration in the field of vision consisting of a partially diminished or entirely degenerated visual acuity that is surrounded by a field of normal – or relatively well-preserved – vision.

The presence of the blind spot scotoma can be demonstrated subjectively by covering one eye, carefully holding fixation with the open eye, and placing an object (such as one’s thumb) in the lateral and horizontal visual field, about 15 degrees from fixation (see the blind spot article). The size of the monocular scotoma is 5×7 degrees of visual angle.

A scotoma can be a symptom of damage to any part of the visual system, such as retinal damage from exposure to high-powered lasers, macular degeneration and brain damage.

You must tell DVLA if you have scotoma.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Seizures? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

SEIZURES is a very generic term that can be attributed to many conditions. Be safe, not sorry and discuss your specific condition with the DVLA medical team, who will provide more detailed and bespoke information and guidance.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from fits, seizures or convulsions.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Sight in one eye only? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

In the UK, there are almost 2 million people living with sight loss. Of these, around 360,000 are registered as blind or partially sighted.  Restricted vision, sight in one eye and other partial blindness conditions are best addressed with the DVLA medical team who will provide more detailed and bespoke information and guidance.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Sleep apnoea? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Sleep apnoea is a relatively common condition where the walls of the throat relax and narrow during sleep, interrupting normal breathing.This may lead to regularly interrupted sleep, which can have a big impact on quality of life and increases the risk of developing certain conditions.

Apnoea and hypopnoea

There are two types of breathing interruption characteristic of OSA:

  • apnoea– where the muscles and soft tissues in the throat relax and collapse sufficiently to cause a total blockage of the airway; it’s called an apnoea when the airflow is blocked for 10 seconds or more

You must tell DVLA if you have:

  • obstructive sleep apnoea which affects your ability to drive safely
  • obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Sleepiness (excessive daytime)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Excessive sleepiness during the day, assuming you are not a night shift worker, is a generic term that can be attributed to many conditions. Be safe, not sorry and discuss your specific condition with the DVLA medical team, who will provide more detailed and bespoke information and guidance.

You must tell DVLA if you are very sleepy during the time you’d normally be awake

You must tell DVLA if you have a spinal condition or an injury to your spine.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Spinal problems and injuries and driving? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Spinal issues, conditions and problems can cover a number of generic terms that can be attributed to many conditions. Be safe, not sorry and discuss your specific condition with the DVLA medical team, who will provide more detailed and bespoke information and guidance.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Stroke? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A stroke is a serious life-threatening medical condition that occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is cut off.

Strokes are a medical emergency and urgent treatment is essential.

The sooner a person receives treatment for a stroke, the less damage is likely to happen.

You only need to tell DVLA if you’re still having problems 1 month after the stroke.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Subarachnoid haemorrhage? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A subarachnoid haemorrhage is an uncommon type of stroke caused by bleeding on the surface of the brain. It’s a very serious condition and can be fatal.

Subarachnoid haemorrhages account for around 1 in every 20 strokes in the UK.

You must tell DVLA if you have suffered a subarachnoid haemorrhage.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Surgery? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A surgery or minor surgical procedure can cover a number of activities that may or may not require you to inform the DVLA. There are a great number of surgical procedure that it is advisable to inform the DVLA. Be safe, not sorry and discuss your specific procedure with the DVLA medical team, who will provide more detailed and bespoke information and guidance.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Syncope? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Syncope, also known as fainting, is a loss of consciousness and muscle strength characterized by a fast onset, short duration, and spontaneous recovery.

Fainting (syncope) is a sudden temporary loss of consciousness that usually results in a fall.

When you faint, you’ll feel weak and unsteady before passing out for a short period of time, usually only a few seconds.

If your blackouts, fainting (syncope) or loss of consciousness affect your driving you must tell DVLA

T

Do I need to tell DVLA about Tachycardia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Tachycardia, also called tachyarrhythmia, is a heart rate that exceeds the normal resting rate. In general, a resting heart rate over 100 beats per minute is accepted as tachycardia in adults. Heart rates above the resting rate may be normal (such as with exercise) or abnormal (such as with electrical problems within the heart).

Tell DVLA if your tachycardia has caused any sudden dizziness or fainting within the last 12 months.

You must also tell DVLA if you have tachycardia or any abnormal heart rhythm that affects your driving, unless:

  • the underlying cause has been identified and treated
  • your heart rhythm is controlled for at least 4 weeks

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Temporal lobe epilepsy? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a chronic disorder of the nervous system characterized by recurrent, unprovoked focal seizures that originate in the temporal lobe of the brain and last about one or two minutes. TLE is the most common form of epilepsy with focal seizures. A focal seizure in the temporal lobe may spread to other areas in the brain when it may become a focal to bilateral seizure.

TLE is usually diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. TLE is diagnosed by taking a medical history, blood tests, and brain imaging. It can have a number of causes such as head injury, stroke, brain infections, structural lesions in the brain, or brain tumours, or it can be of unknown onset. The first line of treatment is through anticonvulsants. Surgery may be an option, especially when there is an observable abnormality in the brain. Another treatment option is electrical stimulation of the brain through an implanted device called the vagus nerve stimulator (VNS).

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Tonic-clonic fits? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A tonic-clonic fit or seizure, previously known as a “grand mal”, is what most people think of as a typical epileptic fit.

They happen in two stages – an initial “tonic” stage, shortly followed by a second “clonic” stage:

  1. tonic stage – you lose consciousness, your body goes stiff, and you may fall to the floor
  2. clonic stage – your limbs jerk about, you may lose control of your bladder or bowel, you may bite your tongue or the inside of your cheek, and you might have difficulty breathing

The seizure normally stops after a few minutes, but some last longer. Afterwards, you may have a headache or difficulty remembering what happened and feel tired or confused.

You must tell DVLA if you’ve had any epileptic attacks, seizures, fits or blackouts.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Tourette’s syndrome? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Tourette’s syndrome is a condition that causes a person to make involuntary sounds and movements called tics.

It usually starts during childhood, but the tics and other symptoms usually improve after several years and sometimes go away completely.

There’s no cure for Tourette’s syndrome, but treatment can help manage symptoms.

You must tell DVLA if your condition affects your driving.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Transient global amnesia? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a neurological disorder whose key defining characteristic is a temporary but almost total disruption of short-term memory with a range of problems accessing older memories. A person in a state of TGA exhibits no other signs of impaired cognitive functioning but recalls only the last few moments of consciousness, as well as deeply encoded facts of the individual’s past, such as their own name

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about a Transient ischaemic attack (TIA)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

A transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or “mini-stroke” is caused by a temporary disruption in the blood supply to part of the brain.

The disruption in blood supply results in a lack of oxygen to the brain. This can cause sudden symptoms similar to a stroke, such as speech and visual disturbance, and numbness or weakness in the face, arms and legs.

However, a TIA doesn’t last as long as a stroke. The effects often only last for a few minutes or hours and fully resolve within 24 hours.

You must stop driving for at least 1 month after a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or mini-stroke. You can restart only when your doctor tells you it is safe.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Tunnel vision? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Tunnel vision (also known as “Kalnienk vision”) is the loss of peripheral vision with retention of central vision, resulting in a constricted circular tunnel-like field of vision. They are varying degrees of tunnel vision.

Be safe, not sorry and discuss your specific condition with the DVLA medical team, who will provide more detailed and bespoke information and guidance.

You must tell DVLA if you have tunnel vision.

 

U

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Usher syndrome? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Usher syndrome, also known as Hallgren syndrome, Usher-Hallgren syndrome, retinitis pigmentosa-dysacusis syndrome, or dystrophia retinae dysacusis syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder caused by a mutation in any one of at least 11 genes resulting in a combination of hearing loss and visual impairment. It is a leading cause of deafblindness and is at present incurable.

Usher syndrome is classed into three subtypes according to onset and severity of symptoms. All three subtypes are caused by mutations in genes involved in the function of the inner ear and retina. These mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern.

You must tell DVLA if you have Usher syndrome.

 

V

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Valve disease or replacement valve? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Valvular heart disease is any disease process involving one or more of the four valves of the heart (the aortic and bicuspid valves on the left side of the heart and the pulmonary and tricuspid valves on the right side of the heart. These conditions occur largely as a consequence of ageing, but may also be the result of congenital (inborn) abnormalities or a specific disease or physiologic processes including rheumatic heart disease and pregnancy.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Ventricular defibrillator? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Ventricular tachycardia (V-tach or VT) is a type of regular and fast heart rate that arises from improper electrical activity in the ventricles of the heart. Although a few seconds may not result in problems, longer periods are dangerous. Short periods may occur without symptoms or present with lightheadedness, palpitations, or chest pain. Ventricular tachycardia may result in cardiac arrest and turn into ventricular fibrillation. entricular tachycardia is found initially in about 7% of people in cardiac arrest.

You must tell DVLA if you have an atrial or ventricular defibrillator.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Vertigo? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Vertigo gets better in most cases without treatment.
Vertigo feels like you or everything around you is spinning – enough to affect your balance. It’s more than just feeling dizzy.A vertigo attack can last from a few seconds to hours. If you have severe vertigo it can last for many days or months.

You must tell DVLA if you suffer from vertigo or dizziness that is sudden, disabling or recurrent.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Vision in one eye only? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Having vision is only one eye, or limited vision, is a unique situation for each individual.

Be safe, not sorry and discuss your specific situation with the DVLA medical team, who will provide more detailed and bespoke information and guidance.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Visual acuity (reduced)? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

In the UK, there are almost 2 million people living with sight loss. Of these, around 360,000 are registered as blind or partially sighted.

Being told you have a visual impairment that can’t be treated can be difficult to come to terms with.

Some people go through a process similar to bereavement, where they experience a range of emotions including shock, anger, and denial, before eventually coming to accept their condition.

You must tell DVLA if you have reduced visual acuity.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about Visual field defects? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

The normal (monocular) human visual field extends to approximately 60 degrees nasally (toward the nose, or inward) from the vertical meridian in each eye, to 107 degrees temporally (away from the nose, or outwards) from the vertical meridian, and approximately 70 degrees above and 80 below the horizontal meridian.

The binocular visual field is the superimposition of the two monocular fields. In the binocular field, the area left of the vertical meridian is referred to as the left visual field (which is temporally for the left, and nasally for the right eye); a corresponding definition holds for the right visual field. The four areas delimited by the vertical and horizontal meridian are referred to as upper/lower left/right quadrants. In the United Kingdom, the minimum field requirement for driving is 60 degrees either side of the vertical meridian, and 20 degrees above and below horizontal.

Be safe, not sorry and discuss your specific situation with the DVLA medical team, who will provide more detailed and bespoke information and guidance.

You must tell DVLA if you have a visual field defect.

 

Do I need to tell DVLA about VP shunts? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

Cerebral shunts are commonly used to treat hydrocephalus, the swelling of the brain due to excess buildup of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). If left unchecked, the cerebrospinal fluid can build up leading to an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP) which can lead to intracranial hematoma, cerebral edema, crushed brain tissue or herniation.he cerebral shunt can be used to alleviate or prevent these problems in patients who suffer from hydrocephalus or other related diseases. Shunts can come in a variety of forms but most of them consist of a valve housing connected to a catheter, the end of which is usually placed in the peritoneal cavity. The main differences between shunts are usually in the materials used to construct them, the types of valve (if any) used, and whether the valve is programmable or not

You must tell DVLA if you’ve had a VP shunt fitted.

 

W

Do I need to tell DVLA about Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome? Please let the DVLA know about this on 0843 133 7183

If you are unsure whether your medical condition should be reported to the DVLA – be safe, not sorry. The DVLA Medical Condition Update team have access to a wealth of information and will be able to guide you whether an further action needs to be taken. Telephoning the DVLA Medical team will put your mind at rest.

You must tell DVLA if you have Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

 

How does DVLA decide what to do with my licence?

DVLA will assess your medical condition or disability and consider the options.

They’ll see if you need a new driving licence, whether you need a shorter licence (that will be reviewed in one, two, three or five years), if you need to adapt your car, or if you have to stop driving.

DVLA won’t take your licence away without giving you a medical reason. It doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll take it forever, and they’ll let you know when you can reapply for your licence. There’s also potential to appeal against the decision.

If I don’t disclose a medical condition, will it affect my car insurance?

A claim on your car insurance could be invalidated if you have an undisclosed notifiable medical condition or your eyesight doesn’t meet the legal minimum requirement.

Each claim is unique, but if you have a medical condition then check with DVLA – hiding it isn’t worth the risk.

Write to DVLA:

Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA),
Longview Road,
Morriston,
Swansea 

SA6 7JL